BYD Dolphin is now available to pre-order

BYD Dolphin is now available to pre-order
BYD Dolphin is now available to pre-order

The BYD Dolphin is now finally available to pre-order in China. This affordable electric car is packed with nice features and has many different versions to choose from, so let’s check them out.

 

BYD Dolphin Vigorous version

  • Length: 4.070 mm
  • Wheelbase: 2.700 mm
  • Width: 1.770 mm
  • Height: 1.570 mm
  • Tire specifications: 195/60 R16
  • Gross vehicle weight: 1.660 kg (with passengers and cargo)
  • Curb weight: 1.285 kg (empty vehicle)
  • Motor: 70 kW and 180 N.m of torque
  • Max speed: 150 km/h
  • Battery capacity: 30,72 kWh
  • Battery chemistry: LFP (LiFePO4) Blade battery by BYD
  • Range: 301 km (NEDC), roughly 225 km in WLTP
  • Consumption: 10,3 kWh/100 km (NEDC), roughly 13,7 kWh/100 km in WLTP
  • On-board charger: 7 kW
  • Fast charging: 40 kW (from 30 to 80 % in 30 minutes)
  • Starting price (after subsidy): 96.800 yuan (12.684 euros)

 

BYD Dolphin Free edition

  • Length: 4.125 mm
  • Wheelbase: 2.700 mm
  • Width: 1.770 mm
  • Height: 1.570 mm
  • Tire specifications: 195/60 R16
  • Gross vehicle weight: 1.780 kg (with passengers and cargo)
  • Curb weight: 1.405 kg (empty vehicle)
  • Motor: 70 kW and 180 N.m of torque
  • Max speed: 150 km/h
  • Battery capacity: 44,928 kWh
  • Range: 405 km (NEDC), roughly 300 km in WLTP
  • Consumption: 11 kWh/100 km (NEDC), roughly 14,7 kWh/100 km in WLTP
  • On-board charger: 7 kW
  • Fast charging: 60 kW (from 30 to 80 % in 30 minutes)
  • Starting price (after subsidy): 106.800 yuan (13.994 euros)

 

BYD Dolphin Fashion edition

  • Length: 4.125 mm
  • Wheelbase: 2.700 mm
  • Width: 1.770 mm
  • Height: 1.570 mm
  • Tire specifications: 195/60 R16
  • Gross vehicle weight: 1.780 kg (with passengers and cargo)
  • Curb weight: 1.405 kg (empty vehicle)
  • Motor: 70 kW and 180 N.m of torque
  • Max speed: 150 km/h
  • Battery capacity: 44,928 kWh
  • Range: 405 km (NEDC), roughly 300 km in WLTP
  • Consumption: 11 kWh/100 km (NEDC), roughly 14,7 kWh/100 km in WLTP
  • On-board charger: 7 kW
  • Fast charging: 60 kW (from 30 to 80 % in 30 minutes)
  • Starting price (after subsidy): 111.800 yuan (14.649 euros)

 

BYD Dolphin Knight edition

  • Length: 4.150 mm
  • Wheelbase: 2.700 mm
  • Width: 1.770 mm
  • Height: 1.570 mm
  • Tire specifications: 205/50 R17
  • Gross vehicle weight: 1.825 kg (with passengers and cargo)
  • Curb weight: 1.450 kg (empty vehicle)
  • Motor: 130 kW and 290 N.m of torque
  • Max speed: 160 km/h
  • Battery capacity: 44,928 kWh
  • Range: 401 km (NEDC), roughly 300 km in WLTP
  • Consumption: 11 kWh/100 km (NEDC), roughly 14,7 kWh/100 km in WLTP
  • On-board charger: 7 kW
  • Fast charging: 60 kW (from 30 to 80 % in 30 minutes)
  • Starting price (after subsidy): 124.800 yuan (16.352 euros)

 

BYD Dolphin exterior and interior

BYD Dolphin exterior and interior

 

The names of the versions were translated from Chinese to English by Google, so don’t give it too much credit. Anyway, while more expensive the Knight edition seems worth it. It’s packed with safety features that you normally don’t see in a car this price, such as:

  • Adaptive cruise system (ACC-S&G)
  • Forward collision warning (FCW)
  • Automatic emergency braking system (AEB)
  • Lane Departure Warning (LDW)
  • Active Lane Keeping (LKS)
  • Traffic sign recognition (TSR)
  • Traffic Congestion Assist (TJA)

 

Moreover, the two most expensive versions come with a “driving recorder”, which I assume it’s a dashcam. I don’t know why dashcams aren’t standard yet in every new car, they help enormously in the case of an accident and the two parts don’t agree on what really happened. In some cases it can even help to lower your insurance premiums.

 

Nonetheless, all versions come with nice features as standard, such as:

  • LED headlights
  • Heat pump for an efficient automatic air conditioning and good battery care
  • Bluetooth and NFC keys so you can open your car with your smartphone
  • OTA (over-the-air) remote firmware updates

 

BYD Dolphin opens with NFC key

 

You probably already know by now what I think about this electric car. At this price point nothing comes close, it really offers great value for money.

However, I also think that BYD needs to introduce a global version to be sold worldwide early next year with a bit more range and faster charging. A version with a WLTP range of 400 km and a fast charging rate of 100 kW will make this electric car not only dominate the entry-level market, but also the mid range.

 

What do you think? Is the current “Knight edition” enough for you – if sold at the right price -, or do you really want more range and faster charging?

 

 

 

More info:

https://www.bydauto.com.cn/auto/dolphinlive.html

https://www.bydauto.com.cn/auto/carShow.html-param=%E6%B5%B7%E8%B1%9A

Pedro Lima

My interest in electric transportation is mostly political. I’m tired of coups and wars for oil. My expectation is that the adoption of electric transportation will be a factor for peace and democracy all over the world.

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Famlin
1 month ago

Thanks Pedro: So Dolphin has 3 different lengths.
Very affordably priced for its size. Only 2 ranges: 300 km & 400 km (NEDC)
I thought there will be long range version like 600 km. Probably BYD wants to sell more cars with certain max range.

If Tesla Model 2 and VW ID.2 comes in this size, then Dolphin has head start.

Tyler Sanders
1 month ago

The BYD Dolphin Knight Edition has a massive power advantage over the other versions without a massive premium. 170 hp and 214 ft pounds of torque is plenty.

Lambda
1 month ago

An extra 15-20 kWh would be very welcome indeed. If shortening the Blade cells isn’t much of a manufacturing compromise, I could imagine getting rid of the center console and replacing it with a battery tower or plinth of sorts. I wouldn’t mind paying an extra $3-4k for it, at $200 per kWh at the pack level.

I suppose upgrading to Guoxuan’s 210 Wh/kg gravimetric energy density levels would also do the trick for the original battery pack dimensions.

Famlin
1 month ago
Reply to  Mike/Liverpool

Mike: Saw this interesting video on plasma kinetics.
Hydrogen (fuelcells) will push petrol & diesel and not the electric vehicles. Simple reason is both of them can run 3 times the distance because of efficiency of motors.

In fact both BEV & FCEV run on motors and they can be integrated as BFEV (Battery Fuelcell Electric Vehicles) with the battery powering for the 1st 50 km and the Fuelcell powering the remaining 350 km. This way for the daily commutes, a home based charging can be used with Fuelcell running for long trips.

For simplicity sake, we can use 3 letter acronyms.
BFV – Battery Fuelcell Vehicle
BEV – Battery Electric Vehicle
FEV – Fuelcell Electric Vehicle

While those vehicles running on petrol can have terms like
PHV – Plugin Hybrid Vehicle
FHV – Full Hybrid Vehicle
MHV – Mile Hybrid Vehicle

EVenthusiast
1 month ago

15 more kwh and sub 20k is what i believe is needed for this to be a success. BYD needs to go all out on the value, do what Lexus did to the luxury sector.

Sam
1 month ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Pedro is there any confirmation from BYD a longer range EA1 is possible?

Sam
1 month ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Yes, but we are getting concerned here that perhaps this was not accurate

Sam
1 month ago

I would really love to see an option with a ~55kwh pack. That way it also beats the Zoe50 and e208 segment.

Otherwise, it looks like an excellent value car — the range makes it fall a little short to be a single car household in my country though (Aust).

Currently I am a likely to buy this. Longer range option and I will definitely buy this.

Rodri
1 month ago

I am not amazed by the specs and charging speed is an issue but at the right price I could buy it as my main vehicle for every day use. Still will need, occasionally, another car with more range/charging speed which could be loaned. Ideally >100kW charging speed or more precisely 10-80 in 25 minutes max. But following our debates in past days, with these specs I don´t see it attractive enough for the mass market. This is not a car you can recommend everyone.

Leo B
1 month ago
Reply to  Rodri

For Europe it needs 11 kW AC and 100 kW DC (for the bigger battery) probably. On the other hand, you can safely charge LFP up to 100% and charging speed doesn’t drop that much in the last 10%.
As for a recommendation, the “Knight” version has equal range, more power, more interior space and more equipment than the e-208 or Kona 39 kWh at about half the price. I guess the Dolphin doesn’t really need your approval (no offense).

Rodri
1 month ago
Reply to  Leo B

🙂 not taken. But the price is not confirmed for Europe yet, nor the 80-100% charging speed. So for me this is not a done deal yet but I agree it has a lot of potential to compete with 208, Kona, Zoe and even the e-Up that, btw, is doing great in Germany right now with lower specs.

steph_tsf
1 month ago

Longitudinally separate the BYD skateboard battery in two halves (a left half, a right half) by a 20 cm x 20 cm longitudinal, structural tunnel. This way the stored energy reduces from 30 kWh to 25 kWh. This way one can add a high performance depolluting exhaust line. Under the hood, longitudinally install a petrol engine featuring 2 or 3 cylinders (ICE silently delivering a 32 kW power), an electric generator (MG1 32 kW), and a planetary gearset (PG 32 kW). Mount a lateral differential that’s capable of a handling a 50 kW mecha power, in an atypical way reminiscent of the Honda Legend KA7 and KA8 (production years 1990 – 1994). There is therefore 32 kW of sustained traction power on the front wheels, whatever the energy source. Where is MG2 located, for implementing the Toyota HSD E-CVT split-power scheme ? Answer : on the rear wheels. Prefer two ridiculously small in-wheel electric motors (each featuring a single-stage 8:1 speed reduction), each capable of delivering a 16 kW power @1,000 rpm. Take advantage of the space that’s left free between the two rear in-wheel electric motors, to mount the fuel tank, which allows a 800 km (500 miles) range. The 32 kW and 16 kW powers I am referring above, are sustained powers. The corresponding peak powers are 50 kW and 25 kW respectively. In BEV mode, the total peak power is thus 100 kW. The automotive-grade Na-ion or Li-Fe2PO4 battery pack that’s storing 25 kWh feels no stress even after cycling 4,000 times a 16 kWh energy that’s providing a 80 km (50 miles) guaranteed range, even handling a “2.0 C” sustained 50 kW charging power, and even handling a “2.0 C” sustained 50 kW discharging power. The fact that the discharging power briefly culminates to 100 kW corresponding to a “4.0 C” peak discharge rate, has little impact on the battery life expectancy, because the automotive-grade Na-ion or Li-FePO4 chemistry that’ used, can cope with a “8.0 C” peak discharging rate. Equip all PHEVs with a bidirectional V2G handsfree recharger, allowing the PHEVs to self-recharge at night in a 50 meters radius, on a time-shared V2G 20 kW charger that can deal with 8 cars per night. I say 8 cars per night because the V2G bidirectional power that’s limited to 20 kW (much less than the manual 50 kW recharge capability), allows to theoretically deliver 160 kW during each night. Indeed, for recharging 8 cars each requiring a 16 kWh energy under a 20 kW power, less than 7 hours are required. Now look, Pedro. Imagine there are 1.5 million motor vehicles in Peru. Imagine there are always 0.5 million motor vehicles V2G connected, thus able to instantly sink or source a 20 kW electric power. The total additional electric grid power is thus 10 GW. This is like building 10 new nuclear cores, ready to instantly reinforce the electric grid. In case of a major electricity production crash whose duration is more than one hour, one can ask the V2G cars to start their petrol engine for delivering a 10 GW electric power during a couple of hours, everywhere in the country. Pedro, do you think that a country that’s achieving such electric grid performance and resilience will be declared as “ennemy” of the USA? Is this too risky? Is this equivalent to asking for Latin America, to get bombed by the USA? Do you understand why PHEVs are soon going to get suppressed by governments and get discredited by all controlled medias? Pedro, try avoid becoming a useful idiot. Pedro, try facing reality. PHEVs now allow us, transitioning from fossil petrol to ethanol. Pedro, try now promoting some “acceptable” ethanol production, instead of keeping focused on automotive-grade batteries. Have a nice day

Last edited 1 month ago by steph_tsf
Buutvrij
1 month ago
Reply to  steph_tsf

And how much farmland will that ethanol cost us? Talking about ‘acceptable’ ha ha..

EVenthusiast
1 month ago
Reply to  steph_tsf

From literally every engineering perspective, it makes no sense to replace a larger battery with an ICE power train. The argument made sense back in 2010 when batteries were twice as heavy and 10 times more expensive, but not anymore.BEVs also have V2G capability.

Famlin
1 month ago
Reply to  steph_tsf

There was a wonderful car called Chevy Volt which ran 85 km on battery alone with another 500 km on petrol at nearly 15 km / l. Unfortunately the company itself (GM) + its suppliers + dealers conspired to kill it. Many expected that it will run on Ethanol (E85) at least in 2nd gen, but GM did not offer that option. Sadly its production was stopped 2 1/2 years ago around this time in 2019-02-14. Still 180.000 of these wonderful cars are in Worlds roads sold as Ampera under Open/Vauxhall/Holden makes in different countries.

Stefan
1 month ago
Reply to  steph_tsf

LMAO dude ethanol is cancer for the planet, have you ever wondered where it comes from?

Famlin
1 month ago
Reply to  Stefan

Ethanol is less cancerous than Oil. When plants grow, they absorb CO2 and when burnt they release CO2 and becomes close energy neutral though not fully.

On the other hand, burning Oil only releases CO2, no absorption.
All this non-sense is big oil propaganda.
Hope you read that taliban has taken over afghanistan. guess where did they get the money from. OIL.

Stefan
1 month ago

Can you explain how are you expecting to charge at 100 KW, since from the released versions’ charge rates and charge times it’s clear it will be air cooled (if cooled at all), not liquid cooled.

Sam
1 month ago
Reply to  Stefan

Hi Stefan I read somewhere it is cooled by refrigerant not liquid… I wonder how heat resistant it is….

Sam
1 month ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Does this mean the refrigerant is a gas as opposed to liquid? If so, what are your thoughts on how will this impact servicing…. I.e. I assume you would need a (costly?) technician to replace the refrigerant gas every few years instead of just pouring an coolant into a tank?

Bob A
1 month ago
Reply to  Sam

Re ‘refrigerant’: Let’s hope it is earth friendly.

The refrigerant would be the same as used in a split system air conditioner. It only gets replaced if there is a leak. Let’s hope that BYD has taken the aspect of vibration into account when designing the system.

Famlin
1 month ago

In 2021-07, Hyundai Ioniq 5 outsold all other BEV & PHEV from Hyundai.
Shows that dedicated BEVs can sell better instead of ICE cars retrofitted with motors + battery.
https://insideevs.com/news/526604/hyundai-plugin-car-sales-july2021/

diego
1 month ago

An Australian youtube channel posted a preview of the Dolphin. Quite nice B-segment car:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmkiv_aT7ec

Mustafa Metin
1 month ago

It is definitely what Europe customer wish. Cheap, solid, safe roomy enough for families with 2 children. And in Turkey as well due to huge tax load on ice cars. (%70-270)