Xpeng P7 with cobalt-free LFP battery is about to arrive

Xpeng P7
Xpeng P7

In China, the Xpeng P7 with a cobalt-free LFP battery will become available to buy in just two days. We now have more details to compare this cobalt-free version to the standard one with a NCM 811 battery, also from CATL.

 

Let’s see the main differences between the two versions.

 

Xpeng P7 with LFP battery

  • Battery cell maker: CATL
  • Capacity: 60,2 kWh
  • Range: 480 km (NEDC)
  • Motor: 196 kW
  • Fast charging: 30 minutes (from 30 to 80 %)
  • Normal charging: 5 hours
  • Acceleration: 6,7 seconds (from 0 to 100 km/h)
  • Top speed: 170 km/h
  • Drag coefficient: 0,236 Cd
  • Weight: 1.895-1.920 kg
  • Starting price: around 200.000 yuan (25.659 euros)

 

Xpeng P7 with NCM 811 battery

  • Battery cell maker: CATL
  • Capacity: 70,8 kWh
  • Range: 586 km (NEDC)
  • Motor: 196 kW
  • Fast charging: 28 minutes (from 30 to 80 %)
  • Normal charging: 5 hours and 42 minutes
  • Acceleration: 6,7 seconds (from 0 to 100 km/h)
  • Top speed: 170 km/h
  • Drag coefficient: 0,236 Cd
  • Weight: 1.865-1.890 kg
  • Starting price: 229.900 yuan (29.496 euros)

 

In China, the Xpeng G3 with a LFP battery should also become available to buy in two days, but there aren’t much details available right now.

 

 

Unfortunately, LFP battery cells currently made by CATL aren’t very energy dense. Right now, LFP battery cells made by Guoxuan and BYD seem to be more advanced.

Anyway, it’s great to see electric cars with cobalt-free batteries gaining traction. I’m eager to see advanced Guoxuan LFP battery cells in a Volkswagen ID.3 and ID.4.

 

 

More info:

https://auto.gasgoo.com/news/202103/1I70243558C107.shtml

Pedro Lima

My interest in electric transportation is mostly political. I’m tired of coups and wars for oil. My expectation is that the adoption of electric transportation will be a factor for peace and democracy all over the world.

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Leo B
3 months ago

//I’m eager to see advanced Guoxuan LFP battery cells in a Volkswagen ID.3 and ID.4.//

Pedro, unfortunately you’ll need some patience. In january a Guoxuan official said the MEB-LFP packs are planned to enter mass production in 2023.

Leonid
3 months ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Pedro, any idea of how Guoxuan plan to achieve such high energy density for LFP cell? As we know LFP cathode is pretty much the same everywhere…

Tyler
3 months ago

200,000 yuan (25.659 euros) wow that starting price for essentially a large Sedan.

Marcel
3 months ago
Reply to  Tyler

Yes, this is also quite a bit lower than the Tesla MIC Model 3 with LFP, which is at 249,900 Yuan. AFAIK.

Dom
3 months ago
Reply to  Tyler

Yes! And the price difference LFP/NCM of 4000€ is pretty cool too.
Now imagine the price if they produce a car at Peugeot 208/Opel Corsa/Renault 5 size..

Marcel
3 months ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

I can’t wait for this to happen!

Marcel
3 months ago

wow this looks like a really good value for a large EV. In theory they shouldn’t be constrained by battery supply as much either.

One thing I’m wondering about is the fast charging rate on the LFP version. It’s only 30kwh in 30 minutes, so the average rate is 60kW. This is only a 1C, which seems pretty conservative for an LFP battery.

Freddy
3 months ago

I’m seeing for +15% price on NCM you get:
+17% battery;
+22% range;
+25% charging Speed (average 75,8kw/h vs 60,2kw/h for the LFP)

Humm…it really doesn’t look good for this specific LFP (for me at least)…. specially if there are also limitations on cold weather….

Also the longer life usually associated to LFP is still so far away for most users….if manufacturers do not offer larger/eextended warranties, it will be difficult to “sell” this idea to a client.

Just my 2 cents…

Marcel
3 months ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Any idea when Guoxuan silicon anode LFP cells might make it into production? And if the use of the silicon anode reduces the cell’s durability?

My guess is that if they’ve solved how to use silicon in the anode, then it won’t affect degradation significantly, since the issues with silicon’s expansion seem to happen on the first cycles, rather than building up over time, like degradation issues in the cathode normally do. But maybe I’m being too optimistic.

Also hopefully these are still low cost cells. Increased costs could come from the manufacturing of the anodes (new technology and processes), or from a manufacturing process that outputs too many bad cells that have to be rejected, etc.

Pajda
3 months ago
Reply to  Freddy

This is very good point and unfortunately it is valid for all modern vehicles with LFP batteries including Tesla. It seems that only gain of using LFP today is still the profit of the manufacturer. The overall parameters of modern High energy Density LFP cells >350 Wh/l are poor in comparison with modern NCA and NMC. This is most visible in charging speed. Also there is not much relevant data about cycle life of HD LFP cells, some published data shows that cycle life is not significantly better than in modern NMC. For me as an customer it is important that cars with modern HD LFP will be at least 20% cheaper than with NMC or they will have significant advantage in some technical aspect like charging speed or low temperature behavior.

Maximilian Holland
3 months ago

Great news. The more LFP options, the better!

Marcel
3 months ago

indeed!

Maximilian Holland
3 months ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

🙂
Diversity is usually a good thing.
Looking forward to the arriving era of battery powered transport (and battery energy systems more generally) which can use a flexible diversity of minerals & resources, (as well as energy generation). Many of these are widely available across many countries and regions, and significantly reduce the various political evils attached to the oil-era. Reduce pollution and climate damage also of course.

Marcel
3 months ago

yes, it’s very exciting to see it happening now. I remember when almost all the articles I could find were about potential new technologies that might work out some time in the future, but were only still at the lab stage. And how difficult it was to finance clean energy projects. Now so many factories are being built, and so much is in commercial production and getting deployed, that it’s really awesome.

Rok
3 months ago

Pedro, what are your thoughts about graphene batteries? I read GAC is about to go into their cars with it https://www.azonano.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=5655

Nick M
3 months ago

Off topic, sort of, but if LFP gains traction in autos, will it make residential LFP batteries cheaper via economies of scale? And vice versa. Or is there too much difference between auto and home batteries?