Tesla keeps improving consumption and range ratings

Tesla keeps improving consumption and range ratings
EPA ratings of Tesla electric cars

The improvement of the efficiency and range in electric cars made by Tesla has been constant and impressive. It shows us why this automaker is ahead of competition (other premium cars, electric or not).

 

Let’s see the evolution of EPA ratings for Tesla’s electric cars in their long range trim-levels.

 

Tesla Model S

Tesla Model S

 

 

2012 Tesla Model S

  • City consumption: 88 MPGe – 23,8 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 89 MPGe – 23,5 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 90 MPGe – 23,3 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 265 miles (426 km)

 

2015 Tesla Model S AWD – 90D

  • City consumption: 95 MPGe – 22 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 100 MPGe – 20,9 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 106 MPGe – 19,8 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 270 miles (435 km)

 

2016 Tesla Model S AWD – 90D

  • City consumption: 101 MPGe – 20,7 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 103 MPGe – 20,3 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 107 MPGe – 19,6 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 294 miles (473 km)

 

2017 Tesla Model S AWD – 100D

  • City consumption: 101 MPGe – 20,7 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 102 MPGe – 20,5 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 102 MPGe – 20,5 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 335 miles (539 km)

 

2020 Tesla Model S Long Range Plus

  • City consumption: 121 MPGe – 17,3 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 117 MPGe – 17,9 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 112 MPGe – 18,7 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 402 miles (647 km)

 

 

Tesla Model X

Tesla Model X

 

 

2016 Tesla Model X AWD – 90D

  • City consumption: 90 MPGe – 23,3 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 92 MPGe – 22,8 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 94 MPGe – 22,3 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 257 miles (414 km)

 

2017 Tesla Model X AWD – 100D

  • City consumption: 86 MPGe – 24,4 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 87 MPGe – 24,1 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 90 MPGe – 23,3 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 295 miles (475 km)

 

2019 Tesla Model X Long Range

  • City consumption: 99 MPGe – 21,2 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 96 MPGe – 21,8 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 93 MPGe – 22,5 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 325 miles (523 km)

 

2020 Tesla Model X Long Range Plus

  • City consumption: 108 MPGe – 19,4 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 105 MPGe – 19,9 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 101 MPGe – 20,7 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 351 miles (565 km)

 

2021 Tesla Model X Long Range Plus

  • City consumption: 109 MPGe – 19,2 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 105 MPGe – 19,9 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 101 MPGe – 20,7 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 371 miles (597 km)

 

 

Tesla Model 3

Tesla Model 3 production version

 

 

2017 Tesla Model 3 Long Range

  • City consumption: 131 MPGe – 16 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 126 MPGe – 16,6 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 120 MPGe – 17,5 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 310 miles (499 km)

 

2018 Tesla Model 3 Long Range

  • City consumption: 136 MPGe – 15,4 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 130 MPGe – 16,1 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 123 MPGe – 17 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 310 miles (499 km)

 

2020 Tesla Model 3 Long Range

  • City consumption: 136 MPGe – 15,4 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 130 MPGe – 16,1 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 123 MPGe – 17 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 330 miles (531 km)

 

2021 Tesla Model 3 Long Range AWD

  • City consumption: 141 MPGe – 14,9 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 134 MPGe – 15,6 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 127 MPGe – 16,5 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 353 miles (568 km)

 

 

Tesla Model Y

Tesla Model Y
Tesla Model Y

 

 

2020 Tesla Model Y Long Range AWD

  • City consumption: 127 MPGe –Β 16,5 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 121 MPGe – 17,3 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 114 MPGe – 18,4 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 316 miles (509 km)

 

2021 Tesla Model Y Long Range AWD

  • City consumption: 131 MPGe – 16 kWh/100 km
  • Combined consumption: 125 MPGe – 16,8 kWh/100 km
  • Highway consumption: 117 MPGe – 17,9 kWh/100 km
  • Total range: 326 miles (525 km)

 

 

It’s impressive how much Tesla managed to improve its electric cars over time. Range and charging times are no longer problems for most people, but price still is.

Now the plan is to start using cobalt-free batteries to further reduce costs and increase production. Only with cobalt-free batteries electric cars can compete with ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) cars in volume production and price.

 

Tesla’s diversified cathode approach

 

LFP/LFMP (iron based) and LNMO (nickel and manganese based) cathode chemistries will play an important role in the coming years.

 

Sharing the same smart strategy of becoming cobalt-free, Tesla and BYD are the most likely automakers to first reach the milestone of selling one million electric cars per year. I’m optimistic and think that this milestone could be reached by 2022 or 2023.

Next year Tesla will start producing its electric cars in Europe (Germany) and BYD will introduce a new EV platform that promises to deliver price, range and safety similar to conventional ICE models.

 

Lastly, the first 7.000 Tesla Model 3 electric cars made in China for European customers have cobalt-free LFP (LiFePO4) batteries and are already on their way to Europe by sea. This is an extremely important step to achieve the massification of electric cars.

We’re getting there…

 

 

 

More info:

https://fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=42755&id=43403&id=43401&id=43406

Pedro Lima

My interest in electric transportation is mostly political. I’m tired of coups and wars for oil. My expectation is that the adoption of electric transportation will be a factor for peace and democracy all over the world.
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Giora
Giora
30 days ago

Impressive! Performance plus efficiency.
Yet short of the king of efficiency: the Ioniq 28 which appeared in 2016 and (from memory) scored 136 MPGe on EPA combined. O.K. it lacks the Tesla performance😎

Pedro Lima
Pedro Lima
30 days ago
Reply to  Giora

The 2020 Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus is the efficiency king with 141 MPGe.

https://fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=38431&id=42278

Hank
Hank
24 days ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Keep in mind EPA ratings are due to a specific test cycle. To further improve their ratings, Tesla scraped the “optional” regenerative breaking, which is now standard setting. They also used further tricks to pump up their EPA ratings as caranddriver mag showed recently.

https://www.caranddriver.com/features/a33824052/adjustment-factor-tesla-uses-for-big-epa-range-numbers/

Famlin
Famlin
30 days ago

From 23,8 kWh/100 km in 2012 to 17,3 kWh/100 km in 2020, what an impressive improvement in efficiency with range increasing from 426 km to 647 km. And the price has gone down from $77.500 (before subsidies) to current $69.420 (at least in USA).

For those who talked fould of Cobalt, these cobalt free batteries are putting such talk to trash bin.

liion
liion
30 days ago

Are we sure the MIC Model3 shipped to europe have LFP batteries?

Pedro Lima
Pedro Lima
30 days ago
Reply to  liion
Freddy
Freddy
30 days ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

I just would like t se reduction on price due to lower production costs of battery and car itself…

Pajda
Pajda
29 days ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

It should be noted that we are talking about SR+ version from China, LR version still must use 21-70 due to energy density no matter where it was build, at least before 4680 enter the mass production.

Barry
Barry
29 days ago
Reply to  Pajda

Is there physical evidence of the form factor of the Tesla SR+ LFP cells?

Pedro Lima
Pedro Lima
29 days ago
Reply to  Barry

So far I’ve only seen a photo of a module.

https://twitter.com/DKurac/status/1316672503478063104

Barry
Barry
29 days ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Thanks! Picture is fuzzy, and if it is a module, at least to me, it does not look like it contains prismatic cells- looks more like pouch cells (but what do I know?)

Also, I just happened to visit the SK Innovation website and there is a mention of a battery with 90% nickel content to be used in Ford EVs. Have any other news on this, Pedro?

Pedro Lima
Pedro Lima
29 days ago
Reply to  Barry

To me it seems that the LFP battery is made with 4 big modules and prismatic cells as it was previously suggested.

https://www.gg-lb.com/art-40365.html

https://pushevs.com/2020/06/11/tesla-model-3-cobalt-free-lfp-version-details/

“SKI succeeded in mass production of high Nickel based EV battery for the first time in the world such as Ni 60% (Hyundai Motors) in 2014, Ni 80% (Kia Motors) in 2018 and Ni 83% (BAIC) this year. Also, Ni 90% based EV battery will be mass produced in 2022 and will be used for Ford’s electric vehicle, again the first in the world.”

The NCM 90 cells that SK innovation says it will introduce in Ford’s electric vehicle by 2022, were already mentioned here.

https://pushevs.com/2019/07/11/ncm-90-successor-of-ncm-811-battery-cells/

What I find surprising is that it seems that the KIA e-Soul and e-Niro have NCM 811 battery cells.

Barry
Barry
28 days ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Thanks, Pedro! Will the Mustang Mach E get the NCM 9.5.5 cells?

Pedro Lima
Pedro Lima
28 days ago
Reply to  Barry

No, they will debut in the Ford F-150 Electric by 2022.

Leo B
Leo B
28 days ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

I thought both the e-Niro and the Mercedes EQC were initially designed for the SKI NCM 811 cells, but because pouch production didn’t start as planned, both cars were built with LG Chem NCM 622 instead. I have read somewhere that SKI only produced cilindrical NCM 811 in 2019 and most of 2020. Also in the news around the BAIC Arcfox alpha-T, it’s mentioned somewhere that this is the first car with SKI’s NCM 811 pouch cells. Don’t know about the e-Soul and I could be wrong on the rest of course.

Pedro Lima
Pedro Lima
28 days ago
Reply to  Leo B

Hi Leo, this is also a surprise to me.

You can read the official statement here:

http://eng.skinnovation.com/ir/faq.asp (answer to 2ΒΊ question)

Barry
Barry
25 days ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Another surprise, at least to me: Panasonic will produce 4680 cells in Nevada. Pedro, do you think Panasonic will use the traditional solvent based electrode process or try to implement the dry electrode calendaring process?

Pedro Lima
Pedro Lima
24 days ago
Reply to  Barry

Hi Barry.

I would also like to know that.

Pajda
Pajda
27 days ago
Reply to  Leo B

Leo, I never heard about cylindrical cells from SKI? I know that they were producing in mass scale pouch cells all the time.

Leo B
Leo B
25 days ago
Reply to  Pajda

Yeah, I shouldn’t write things from memory without checking…

What I find now is:

Both SKI and LG Chem announced NCM 811 in early 2018, around february. It was LG Chem that produced cylindrical cells, starting about a year later. LG Chem pouch moved to NCM 712, as well documented on this blog by Pedro.

SKI only started production of NCM 811 pouch in 2019 Q3 (*). So the e-Niro had SKI NCM 622 cells, at least up to that time and probably still does. Maybe the new generation e-Soul has NCM 811, but I’ve not seen confirmation of that.

(*) https://dlit.co/report-sk-innovation-to-begin-making-nmc-811-cells-in-q3-2019/

yoyo
yoyo
25 days ago

Here comes some more competition to the EU in the form on NIO…
http://autonews.gasgoo.com/new_energy/70017690.html