SVOLT unveils interesting data on its cobalt-free batteries (update)

SVOLT battery cell maker

Great news today!

SVOLT just unveiled very interesting data about its cobalt-free EV batteries. There are four different cells and two different platforms for different purposes.

The Chinese battery cell maker proposes two platforms, one optimized for cost (E-platform) and other optimized for range (H-platform).

 

Let’s see the data!

 

E-platform (LFMP cathode is my guess)

My guess is that this economic platform uses the high-voltage version of LFP (LFMP) cathode chemistry. While LFP cells have a nominal voltage around 3,2 V, LFMP operates at 17 % higher voltage (3,75 V).

These battery cells are VDA compatible (148 mm of length).

 

  • Usage: mid-range electric cars
  • Cycle life: 4.000 cycles
  • Gravimetric energy density: 20 % higher than LFP (above 200 Wh/kg)
  • Capacities: 90 and 115 Ah
  • Cost: 17 % cheaper than LFP (less than 60 euros per kWh)
  • Debut: 2021

 

LFMP battery cell (90 Ah)

  • Capacity: 90 Ah
  • Voltage: 3,75 V
  • Energy: 337 Wh
  • Length: 148 mm
  • Height: 102,5 mm
  • Thickness: 39 mm
  • Volume: 0,591630 L
  • Volumetric energy density: 570 Wh/L

 

LFMP battery cell (115 Ah)

  • Capacity: 115 Ah
  • Voltage: 3,75 V
  • Energy: 431 Wh
  • Length: 148 mm
  • Height: 112 mm
  • Thickness: 52 mm
  • Volume: 0,861952 L
  • Volumetric energy density: 500 Wh/L

 

Hypothetical battery pack 1 (90 Ah)

  • Cell disposition: 96s1p
  • Capacity: 32,4 kWh (96 x 3,75 V x 90 Ah)
  • Voltage: 360 V
  • Cost: below 3.000 euros (active and passive material)

 

Hypothetical battery pack 2 (115 Ah)

  • Cell disposition: 96s1p
  • Capacity: 41,4 kWh (96 x 3,75 V x 115 Ah)
  • Voltage: 360 V
  • Cost: below 4.000 euros (active and passive material)

 

 

H-platform (LNMO cathode)

This is the high-end platform that uses the LNMO cathode chemistry. The 115 Ah battery cell (220 mm of length) is compatible with Volkswagen’s MEB platform.

 

  • Usage: mid and high-range electric cars
  • Cycle life: at least 3.000 cycles
  • Gravimetric energy density: 235-245 Wh/kg
  • Capacities: 115 and 226 Ah
  • Cost: 8-12,5 % cheaper than NCM (less than 90 euros per kWh)
  • Debut: 2020 (in-vehicle testing is already underway)

 

LNMO battery cell (115 Ah)

  • Capacity: 115 Ah
  • Voltage: 3,81 V
  • Energy: 438 Wh
  • Length: 220 mm
  • Height: 102,5 mm
  • Thickness: 33,4 mm
  • Volume: 0,753170 L
  • Volumetric energy density: 582 Wh/L
  • Weight: 1.788 g (estimation)
  • Gravimetric energy density: 245 Wh/kg

 

LNMO battery cell (226 Ah)

  • Capacity: 226 Ah
  • Voltage: 3,81 V
  • Energy: 861 Wh
  • Length: 574 mm
  • Height: 118 mm
  • Thickness: 21,5 mm
  • Volume: 1,456238 L
  • Volumetric energy density: 591 Wh/L
  • Weight: 3.664 g (estimation)
  • Gravimetric energy density: 235 Wh/kg

 

Hypothetical battery pack 1 (115 Ah)

  • Cell disposition: 96s1p
  • Capacity: 42 kWh (96 x 3,81 V x 115 Ah)
  • Voltage: 366 V
  • Weight: 202 kg (estimated with a GCTPR of 85 %)
  • Cost: below 5.000 euros (active and passive material)

 

Hypothetical battery pack 2 (226 Ah)

  • Cell disposition: 96s1p
  • Capacity: 82,7 kWh (96 x 3,81 V x 226 Ah)
  • Voltage: 366 V
  • Weight: 414 kg (estimated with a GCTPR of 85 %)
  • Cost: below 9.000 euros (active and passive material)

 

In CTP (cell-to-pack) batteries, the GCTPR (gravimetric cell-to-pack ratio) is higher than in batteries that use modules.

 

 

Summing up, with the mass production of cobalt-free batteries for electric cars the ICE age is over.

It’s great to see a battery cell maker focused on cobalt-free battery cells.

While it’s obvious that there’s no future for EV batteries that use cobalt, the dependence on nickel can also be problematic (rising cost). LFP and LFMP are the battery chemistries that can make electric cars finally compete with ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) counterparts in volume production and price.

For a while I wondered which major battery cell maker would be the first to mass produce the LFMP chemistry. Now it seems to be SVOLT, unless BYD, Guoxuan and CATL have something hidden in their sleeves…

As previously reported SVOLT is already in-vehicle testing its cobalt-free LNMO batteries.

 

 

More info:

http://autonews.gasgoo.com/70017601.html

https://na.eventscloud.com/file_uploads/8cd9202e00811451e00cb24b78ad556a_O2.01_Margret_Wohlfahrt-Mehrens.pdf (page 16)

https://www.customcells.de/fileadmin/customcells/Dokumente/Newsletter/CUSTOMCELLS-Newsletter-2018-03-01-LMFP.pdf

Pedro Lima

My interest in electric transportation is mostly political. Iโ€™m tired of coups and wars for oil. My expectation is that the adoption of electric transportation will be a factor for peace and democracy all over the world.

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Prabhakar Singh
1 year ago

Is this possible to achieve similar energy density of NMC with economy series cells???

Famlin
1 year ago

: 2 more batteries (LFMP & LNMO) without Cobalt is a great news.ย 
Seems this will enable 100 KWh packs for just $10.000.

Just curious: How come you did not cover any article on “battery day”.

Famlin
1 year ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

I understand Pedro. They did not give details about the battery and instead they talked about the production process.ย 

I had a vague hope that they will move into prismatic battery which can occupy the whole space, but they stuck with cylindrical cells. Lets see how it all plays out.

Joza
1 year ago
Reply to  Famlin

You did not listen carefully. They want to manufacture huge amount of quantities. It’s easier with cylindrical. Additionally, battery pack will be much simpler and easier to cool. And most importantly – battery pack is structural part of the car.

If they succeed in everything they plan, they will crush competition easily.

Marcel
1 year ago
Reply to  Joza

I agree Joza. I think the biggest idea from battery day was the manufacturing: building the machine that makes the machine. The tabless design, dry electrode process, and other innovations are mainly important not because they enable longer range but because they will enable Tesla to achieve much higher production volumes on a much faster timeline. The fact that they will also enable a cheaper Tesla that will greatly expand its market share is another element that facilitates the much higher production volumes.

buu
1 year ago
Reply to  Famlin

there is never whole space:
https://youtu.be/iPcrBg7BgsU?t=256

antrik
11 months ago
Reply to  Famlin

The wasted space between densely packed cylindrical cells is not that much, and mostly (if not entirely) made up by much better internal space utilisation compared to prismatic cells.

Hudini
1 year ago

As I understand 96 in series and 1 parallel. It means that all current goes true all cells?

Alok
1 year ago

Great !
Any info on fast charging speed ?
Should be high, right ?
Long cycle life even with lots of fast charging, I guess.
Thanks !

Maximilian Holland
1 year ago

Great to see LFMP starting to appear in EVs! Thanks Pedro. This will be the volume and cost enabler for global volumes of mass market EVs.

Marcel
1 year ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Yes, whoever gets their hands on these first will have a huge advantage. I have probably forgotten, but is there any indication that SVOLT will be able to rapidly increase their production capacity, or will we have to wait for a year or two to find that out?

Marcel
1 year ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Dang, those plans seem fairly unambitious compared to LG Chem and CATL. Only the the Changzhou plant will be producing before 2023, and that won’t be at the claimed 30GWh capacity until 2025, so it will be years before they’re supplying enough batteries for more than ~100,000 EVs.

Hopefully someone like VW would be able to step in with some money so SVOLT can speed that process up, but it really seems like Tesla’s vertical integration (which can spend money to battery manufacturing directly) plus their seeming ability to build factories super fast might be an outlier.

Maximilian Holland
1 year ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Yes. And when SVOLT are showing the value of LFMP, that will stimulate more investment in this chemistry variant, by the likes of CATL, BYD and others.

Marcel
1 year ago

This is great news Pedro, thanks for posting. Now what remains to be seen is how fast SVOLT can ramp up their production capacity, and like you said in other comments, which car makers are going to obtain these.

on other question, With the hypothetical batteries, is it possible to use a 108s1p or 120s1p set up, or does that bring the overall voltage too high? Or to increase capacity, would they have to double up to 96s2p?

I know the higher voltage would enable faster charging, but would a 450V battery have other drawbacks like requiring more expensive inverters or something like that? Most packs seem to be in the 350-375V range.

Marcel
1 year ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Thanks. So maybe ~390V which is similar to the e-tron is the normal setup for EVs, otherwise theyโ€™ll have to spend money on specialized electronics.

That at least allows for ~145kW charging, considering that current chargers max out at 375A.

Denny
1 year ago

Why is there NO info about these chemistries on svolt webpages?

Alex
1 year ago

Hopefully 50kwh packs are now the new normal. Sure 32 might be fine in a short range city car like an e-up but for everything else bigger is necessary. Even the Zoe is upto 52kwh now. I do not think too many new EVs will appear with such small packs. Or if they do have the small pack they will also have a larger option like the Kona 64kwh which will make up 90% of sales. Yes bigger packs are more expensive but if the difference in ยฃ3000 extra for a ยฃ30,000 car to drive 300 miles instead of 175miles then you would be mad not to upgrade

Maximilian Holland
1 year ago
Reply to  Alex

Giving size/range options is the way to go. I think Musk made a mistake when he said that “almost 300 miles” will be the minimum entry point. Some people will be happy with less than that if it saves them money. This will especially be the case when we see 10k to 20k price points, where saving 1k on a modest sized pack, is a more significant proportion of the final price.
VW’s ID.3 is the best example of “range choices” so far.

antrik
11 months ago

Real-world experience shows again and again that very few people are willing to take a slightly cheaper EV with significantly lower range. It’s just doesn’t feel like a good deal.

Pajda
1 year ago

Hi Pedro,

I see some inconsistency in this statement “While LFP cells have a nominal voltage around 3,2 V, LFMP operates at 17 % higher voltage (3,75 V).” I think that there is mixed nominal voltage of LFP (3.2 V) with fully charged voltage of LFMP(3.75 V) So i think that correct values are:

LFP: 3.2 V nominal – 3.55V fully charged
LFMP: 3.4 Vnominal – 3.75V fully charged?

Pajda
1 year ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Thanks for clarification

Colin Palmer
1 year ago
Reply to  Pedro Lima

Hi Pedro. Does the new Tesla model 3 sr+ made in China with catl lfp have a stealth โ€œmillion mile battery โ€œ ? 290 miles x 4000 cycles ?

antrik
11 months ago

Since the 115 Ah LNMO cell is not designed for cell-to-pack, the 15% pack overhead assumption for the “hypothetical pack” using it makes no sense.

antrik
11 months ago

If the LFMP cells are to cost 100 Euro per kWh?