Comparison of different EV batteries in 2020 (updated)

Comparison of different EV batteries in 2020 (updated)
Audi e-tron battery

During the first years after I started this blog in 2015 I often wrote articles demonstrating that legacy automakers weren’t taking electric cars seriously. They were actively trying to prove that electric cars didn’t work by selling overpriced cars with low range and blamed battery technology, when they weren’t even using the best battery technologies available at the time. Back then, Tesla was the only automaker using the most energy dense batteries available, which were NCA battery cells in cylindrical form. Most automakers were using LMO battery cells in their electric cars, which are far from great…

 

Different battery cathode chemistries comparison

 

When automakers – pushed by stricter emissions regulations – finally started to get a little more serious about electric cars, battery cell makers began to develop NCM high energy density cells in prismatic and pouch forms, especially made to use in electric cars. Until then, the most interested in high energy density battery cells were laptop manufacturers, that’s why they were made in cylindrical form.

Now in 2020 the scenario is very different from what we had when I started this blog in 2015. Legacy automakers are actually selling electric cars with good batteries. Most of them are now using NCM 523 or NCM 622 battery cells and prepare to upgrade to even more energy dense cells such as NCM 712, NCM 811 and even NCMA.

Performance of different advanced battery cell cathodes

 

Note: the chart above is a bit outdated considering that now NCM 811 battery cells can easily surpass 1.000 cycles before reaching the EOL (End of Life). However, it still shows us that NCMA, which combines the best characteristics of NCM and NCA chemistries represents a solid improvement.

 

Anyway, right now it seems that two cathode chemistries will dominate the EV battery world in the near future. The NCMA cathode which offers the best energy density and the cobalt-free LFMP cathode which offers the best cost. A smart strategy for automakers would be to offer the same electric car with two different battery packs, one optimized for range and another for cost.

 

Now that I gave you a bit of context let’s move to the interesting part and compare some batteries of popular electric cars.

 

Volkswagen e-Golf

2019 Volkswagen e-Golf

 

  • Total battery capacity: 35,8 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 32 kWh (89 %)
  • Battery weight: 349 kg
  • Battery energy density: 103 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 264 (88s3p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 333 (also known as NCM 111)
  • Manufacturer: Samsung SDI
  • TMS: passive air cooling

 

NCM 333 means that the cathode besides lithium contains nickel, cobalt and manganese in a composition ratio of 3:3:3 (equal parts), which is the same for NCM 111.

 

Volkswagen e-up, SEAT Mii Electric and Skoda CITIGOe iV

New ŠKODA CITIGOe iV

 

  • Total battery capacity: 36,8 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 32,3 kWh (88 %)
  • Battery weight: 248 kg
  • Battery energy density: 148 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 168 (84s2p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 622
  • Manufacturer: LG Chem
  • TMS: passive air cooling

 

Renault Twingo ZE

New 2020 Renault Twingo ZE side-rear

 

  • Total battery capacity: 22 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 21,3 kWh (97 %)
  • Battery weight: 165 kg
  • Battery energy density: 133 Wh/kg
  • Chemistry: NCM 622 (not confirmed, just my guess)
  • Manufacturer: LG Chem
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

Renault ZOE

New Renault ZOE in Glacier White colour

 

ZE 40 battery of old generation Renault ZOE

  • Total battery capacity: 44,1 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 41 kWh (93 %)
  • Battery weight: 305 kg
  • Battery energy density: 145 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 192 (96s2p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 622
  • Manufacturer: LG Chem
  • TMS: active air cooling

 

ZE 50 battery of new generation Renault ZOE

  • Total battery capacity: 54,66 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 52 kWh (95 %)
  • Battery weight: 326 kg
  • Battery energy density: 168 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 192 (96s2p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 712
  • Manufacturer: LG Chem
  • TMS: active air cooling

 

Note: In the new generation Renault ZOE the ZE 40 battery is just a ZE 50 battery with capacity software-limited by the BMS (Battery Management System). It’s not the same ZE 40 battery that was available in the old generation.

In the new generation Renault ZOE the ZE 40 battery is just a ZE 50 battery with capacity limited by the BMS

 

LG Chem already stated that it reserves the NCM 811 chemistry to cylindrical cells and pouch cells get NCM 712 first, then NCMA in 2022.

 

BMW i3

BMW i3

 

Old generation 94 Ah battery

  • Total battery capacity: 33,77 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 27,2 kWh (80 %)
  • Battery weight: 256 kg
  • Battery energy density: 132 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 96 (96s1p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 333 (also known as NCM 111)
  • Manufacturer: Samsung SDI
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

New generation 120 Ah battery

  • Total battery capacity: 42,2 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 37,9 kWh (90 %)
  • Battery weight: 278 kg
  • Battery energy density: 152 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 96 (96s1p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 622
  • Manufacturer: Samsung SDI
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

Peugeot e-208 and Opel Corsa-e

Peugeot e-208

 

  • Total battery capacity: 50 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 46 kWh (92 %)
  • Battery weight: 356 kg
  • Battery energy density: 140 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 216 (108s2p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 523 (not confirmed, just my guess)
  • Manufacturer: CATL
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

Nissan LEAF

2018 Nissan Leaf on the road

 

40 kWh battery

  • Total battery capacity: 39,46 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 36 kWh (91 %)
  • Battery weight: 303 kg
  • Battery energy density: 130 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 192 (96s2p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 523
  • Manufacturer: Envision AESC
  • TMS: passive air cooling

 

62 kWh battery

  • Total battery capacity: 62 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 56 kWh (90 %)
  • Battery weight: 410 kg (estimation)
  • Battery energy density: 151 Wh/kg (estimation)
  • Cells: 288 (96s3p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 523
  • Manufacturer: Envision AESC
  • TMS: passive air cooling

 

Both battery packs use the same NCM 523 battery cells, but AESC did manage to maximize the disposition of the cells to fit more in the same space. With 288 cells the bigger battery pack is discharged at lower C-rates, which also helps to increase the current efficiency (coulombic efficiency), otherwise its capacity would just be 59,19 kWh (39,46 kWh x 3 / 2).

 

Chevrolet Bolt EV and Opel Ampera-e

2020 Chevrolet Bolt EV

 

Old generation

  • Total battery capacity: 62,2 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 58 kWh (93 %)
  • Battery weight: 435 kg
  • Battery energy density: 143 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 288 (96s3p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 622
  • Manufacturer: LG Chem
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

New 2020 generation

  • Total battery capacity: 68 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 64 kWh (94 %)
  • Battery weight: 430 kg
  • Battery energy density: 158 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 288 (96s3p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 712 (not confirmed)
  • Manufacturer: LG Chem
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

The battery capacity advertised by Chevrolet is neither total nor usable, is something in between…

Regarding the new 2020 generation, it is likely that there was a change to NCM 712 battery cells and although the increase in energy density seems minimal, there is an explanation. The 2020 Chevrolet Bolt EV now has the “cold weather battery pack” that according to GM allows 150 % faster DC charging in cold weather.

This “cold weather battery pack” means better insulation and heating of the battery but is likely to result in extra weight. Explaining why the energy density of the battery pack only increased from 143 to 158 Wh/kg, while in the Renault ZOE, the upgrade to NCM 712 battery cells resulted in an energy density increase from 145 to 169 Wh/kg.

 

Hyundai Kona Electric

2019 Hyundai Kona Electric

 

Long range version

  • Total battery capacity: 67,5 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 64 kWh (94 %)
  • Battery weight: 452 kg
  • Battery energy density: 149 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 294 (98s3p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 622
  • Manufacturer: LG Chem
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

This battery pack is made with the same LG Chem LGX E63 cells that we find in the Renault ZE 40 battery, but instead of 192 cells (96s2p), Hyundai uses 294 cells (98s3p).

 

Hyundai IONIQ Electric

Hyundai IONIQ Electric

 

  • Total battery capacity: 40,4 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 38,3 kWh (94 %)
  • Battery weight: 359 kg (without battery heater) and 363 kg (with battery heater)
  • Battery energy density: 112,4 Wh/kg (without battery heater) and 111,2 Wh/kg (with battery heater)
  • Cells: 176 (88s2p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 622
  • Manufacturer: LG Chem
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

This battery pack is made with the same LG Chem LGX E63 cells that we find in the Renault ZE 40 battery, but instead of 192 cells (96s2p), Hyundai uses 176 cells (88s2p).

 

Kia e-Soul

Kia e-Soul

 

  • Total battery capacity: 67,5 kWh (estimation)
  • Usable battery capacity: 64 kWh (94 %)
  • Battery weight: 457 kg
  • Battery energy density: 148 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 294 (98s3p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 622
  • Manufacturer: SK Innovation
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

Kia e-Niro

Kia e-Niro

 

  • Total battery capacity: 67,5 kWh (estimation)
  • Usable battery capacity: 64 kWh (94 %)
  • Battery weight: 457 kg
  • Battery energy density: 148 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 294 (98s3p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 622
  • Manufacturer: SK Innovation
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

Jaguar I-PACE

Jaguar I-PACE

 

  • Total battery capacity: 90 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 84,7 kWh (94 %)
  • Battery weight: 603 kg
  • Battery energy density: 149 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 432 (108s4p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 622
  • Manufacturer: LG Chem
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

Jaguar uses the same LG Chem LGX N2.1 battery cells that we find in the old generation battery pack of the Chevrolet Bolt EV. But instead of 288 cells (96s3p), Jaguar uses 432 cells (108s4p) in their battery packs.

 

Mercedes-Benz EQC

Mercedes-Benz EQC in white

 

  • Total battery capacity: 85 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 80 kWh (94 %)
  • Battery weight: 652 kg
  • Battery energy density: 130 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 384 (96s4p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 622
  • Manufacturer: LG Chem or SK Innovation (there are conflicting reports)
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

Audi e-tron 55 quattro

Audi e-tron 55 quattro

 

  • Total battery capacity: 95 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 86,5 kWh (91 %)
  • Battery weight: 700 kg
  • Battery energy density: 136 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 432 (108s4p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 622
  • Manufacturer: LG Chem
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

Porsche Taycan Turbo S

Porsche Taycan Turbo S

 

  • Total battery capacity: 93,4 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 83,7 kWh (87 %)
  • Battery weight: 630 kg
  • Battery energy density: 148 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 396 (198s2p)
  • Chemistry: NCM 622
  • Manufacturer: LG Chem
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

Tesla Model X

Tesla Model X

 

Long range version

  • Total battery capacity: 102,4 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 98,4 kWh (96 %)
  • Battery weight: 630 kg
  • Battery energy density: 162 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 8.256 (96s86p)
  • Chemistry: NCA
  • Manufacturer: Panasonic
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

Tesla Model S

Tesla Model S

 

Long range version

  • Total battery capacity: 102,4 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 98,4 kWh (96 %)
  • Battery weight: 630 kg
  • Battery energy density: 162 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 8.256 (96s86p)
  • Chemistry: NCA
  • Manufacturer: Panasonic
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

Tesla Model 3

Tesla Model 3 production version

 

Long range version

  • Total battery capacity: 80,5 kWh
  • Usable battery capacity: 76 kWh (94 %)
  • Battery weight: 478 kg
  • Battery energy density: 168 Wh/kg
  • Cells: 4.416 (96s46p)
  • Chemistry: NCA
  • Manufacturer: Panasonic
  • TMS: active liquid cooling

 

 

Expected incoming upgrades

  1. Envision AESC that supplies battery cells to Nissan will upgrade its cells from NCM 523 to NCM 811 during this year. Nissan has the chance to upgrade the LEAF with more energy dense battery cells and finally give it an active TMS (Temperature Management System) to properly handle fast charging and prevent excessive capacity degradation.
  2. Hyundai could upgrade their battery cells to NCM 712 already this year, or wait until 2022 to get the NCMA cells from LG Chem instead.
  3. Next year Samsung SDI will bring its own NCM 811 battery cells and the BMW i3 will probably be the first electric car to get them. The battery capacity will likely increase around 10 kWh from the current 42,2 kWh to 52 kWh.

 

While I think that’s important to keep pushing for more energy dense batteries that give electric cars the best range possible, I also think that’s important to make them affordable. This is why we also need cobalt-free batteries like LFMP. Allowing customers to choose which kind of battery they want (maximized for range or cost) is the strategy that I think will become norm in the near future.

Bonus: if you want to know what a battery cell maker like Samsung SDI thinks about this strategy take a look at this internal report (translated from Korean to English).

 

 

More info:

https://sci-hub.tw/https://www.nature.com/articles/s41560-019-0513-0

https://fueleconomy.gov/feg/download.shtml

https://www.emove360.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/AVL-Series-Battery-Benchmarking.pdf

https://www.kivi.nl/uploads/media/5b23b49ab2834/11.00-Priatherm-Batenburg.pdf

https://cii-resource.com/cet/AABE-03-17/Presentations/BMGT/Prochazka_Wenzel.pdf

https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/17_-_tesla_-_success_story_or_hype_ver_3_deleon.pdf

https://electricrevs.com/2018/03/09/jaguar-and-chevy-have-lg-in-common/

Pedro Lima

56
Leave a Reply

facile

Thanks for another interesting article.
Between two similar models like Zoe 50 and e-208, with slighly different battery types and different TMS, ¿should we expect to get more cycles from one or the other?

I would expect more cycles from the CATL battery in the Peugeot e-208. Imagine that the ZOE’s battery is on the top and the e-208’s is on the bottom.
comment image

However, in my opinion what matters the most is the ability to choose the SOC charging limit. I don’t know if the new ZOE and e-208 have it.

https://pushevs.com/2018/04/27/battery-charging-full-versus-partial/

Paulo de Almeida

You can’t calculate battery “energy density” dividing the battery capacity by its pack weight! That is totally wrong !!!

Matt

Yes you can. That is exactly what energy density is. Energy/weight. Simple maths really… Anode and cathode don’t work in isolation. They need packaging wether it’s a single cell or a whole car battery pack, those are systems that provide a certain amount of energy. Therefore it’s a completely valid measurement

JohnsonTV

It’s much more pertinent to BEVs to calculate volumetric energy density. For most OEMs, available space dictates range.

Terry

Hydrogen will replace batteries ss recent developments increase production by 25x using just water as a fuel source. Longer range, less than 4 minutes fully fueling times, no ultra expensive replacements costs and way less env damage all point to bed asva sucker sale.

Nate

Are you ignoring that the hydrogen has to be made, and likely shipped and stored as well?
That’s a huge obstacle.

Babak

He is saying water as fuel source not H2

Shaun

And electricity does not have to be mafe, stored and/ delivered?

Earl Colby Pottinger

But the delivery already exists for electricity, for hydrogen you have to build all the infrastructure needed first, and that cost a lot of money.

Plus, a charger can exist at home for less than a $1000, how much for the few hydrogen producer/compressors out there.

Hydrogen is a way for the oil companies to keep you paying them. Electricity is not only cheaper, but in my case I own solar panels, I don’t even need to pay to charge my BEV.

Stefan

@Shaun, hydrogen is made with electricity, so electricity has to be made, stored and delivered to be able to make, store and deliver hydrogen. Also hydrogen is extremely dangerous and the molecule permeates any possible container technology we can make. Hydrogen may have some niche use somewhere on the planet but it’s stupid beyond belief to have a mainstream hydrogen economy.

Abeh

Extracting H from H2O is no simple feat !

Jim jam

And how does the water turn into hydrogen, magic?
Ignoring the electric used doesn’t stop the process being any less efficient.

Basic maths suggest hydrogen has nothing going for it not even fast fueling. Over a year a hydrogen is slower 360 days off the year to fuel.

Neromanceres

I would have guessed that the 2020 Bolt EV was already on NCM712. We know for sure from GM’s EV day presentation that their new battery factory in partnership with LG Chem will be producing NCMA in late 2021 starting with the GMC Hummer.

I changed my mind and edited my answer so many times to only realize that you’re probably right.

Thanks I revised the article with my final thought on the subject.

Nestor

What about the ID.3 and its three possible battery capacities, do you know anything about topology and chemistries?

Volkswagen says that the ID. platform can use both, prismatic and pouch battery cells.
comment image

https://www.volkswagenag.com/en/news/stories/2018/10/powerful-and-scalable-the-new-id-battery-system.html

The Volkswagen ID.3 will be available with 3 battery options.

1. Standard range: 45 kWh (usable) and 330 km of WLTP range (LFMP from CATL in 2021)
2. Mid range: 58 kWh (usable) and 420 km of WLTP range (NCM 622 from LG Chem in 2020)
3. Long range: 77 kWh (usable) and 550 km of WLTP range (NCM 811 from CATL in 2021)

These are just my guesses about the chemistries, nothing official.

Babak

Why no info on solid state Li battery

Because we won’t get there in the near future. Right now it’s an unicorn and when it finally starts production, we’ll see them first in smartphones and drones before electric cars.

Having this said, Samsung prototype is promising.

https://pushevs.com/2020/03/10/samsung-unveils-solid-state-lithium-metal-batteries/

Babak

2 company’s SSB products are in beta test…your data maybe a bit old

Max Holland

Beta tests are not the same as commercial application, nor do they address THE single most important frontier for EV batteries – achieving ever lower costs.

You can bang this drum again in a few years if/when solid electrolytes make their way into affordable EVs. They will have a hard time competing with LFMP on cost (and even on practical durability and C-rates).

Jerry Roane

Rolling battery swap at 40 mph in 40 milliseconds beats gasoline or diesel. By constantly swapping, the pack shrinks by 75 percent and because it is shallow discharged it lasts many times longer. Guideway further reduces the necessary energy. The DOE has this as well as the US and Chinese patent offices. Obsoleting oil is going to take the public demanding clean air at a lower cost of ownership. The biggest attraction is being allowed to go three times faster legally on the high speed elevated guideway.

Jordan

I’m a bit impressed that this article is differentiating actual capacity with usable capacity. It is a neccessary piece of data for determining the length of the battery’s life cycle. I have never seen anyone report this crucial data before. Thanks

Max Holland

Great article Pedro, full of rich data and sensible analysis, thank you!

Mark Forcum

Here in the USA we have been selling Ev’s and Hybrid vehicles and we still don’t have an end of life(aka recycling system) in place to take old units. Only some current Model Toyota and Honda vehicles have a secondary market.
A big hazardous waste stream is being developed without any solution….

Shaun

Recycling of these batteries is the elephant in the room

Earl Colby Pottinger

The reason you see so little recycling is that the old batteries are being snapped up for DIY projects and power banks.

Try EV-West site for example.

Gareth Claase

I love these articles. Thank you.

I hadn’t realised that many of even the latest EVs don’t yet use the latest battery chemistries. I find that quite exciting, though, as it suggests that in the next two years EVs will go up another step in terms of attractiveness. Certainly greater range at no greater cost? Perhaps ushering in the age of mass adoption very soon.

The new VW eUp!, as your other article makes clear, is already proving popular. Imagine the same car with another 25% of range. Feels like we’re getting there, would you agree?

The upgrade from NCM 523 and NCM 622 to NCM 811 battery cells represents on average a volumetric energy density increase of 30 % and a gravimetric energy density increase of 20 %, so it definitely can give the 25 % range boost you mention, which is great. However, I’m more exited about the upcoming cobalt-free LFMP cells than NCM 811 or NCMA. That’s what is needed to make electric cars affordable and mainstream. CATL battery cell plant in Germany is expected to start production next year, that will be a major stepping stone, since Chinese battery cell makers are… Read more »

Marcos Henz

I have the same feeling… we don´t need anything better than LFMP for the revolution.

Gwyn

Tesla will be offering LFMP for TESLA 3/Y in China to lower cost (& lower range as side effect) but these batteries are coming especially with increasing pack density by removing the intermediate modules and forming the cells / pouches directly into a vehicle battery pack

Magnus

Great article. But what do you base the “Safety” rating on, shown in the first figure “Different battery cathode chemistries comparison”. Do you have any source for this? I’m curious.

The chart you mention comes from this paper.

https://sci-hub.tw/https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-662-53071-9_4

LFP/LFMP are very safe chemistries. For example, if you overcharge a LiFePO4 (LFP) battery cell you will destroy it, but it won’t be a safety problem. Do the same with less safe chemistry like a NCA battery cell and it’ll catch fire and explode.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qzt9RZ0FQyM

Jakub Coltun

I recently heard about aluminum air battery technology
originating from the UK. Will you or have you done an article or post about Aluminum Air batteries?

Hi Jakub. I tend to focus on battery technologies that will be available in the near future (1 or 2 years). Reputable battery cell makers such as LG Chem and SK Innovation started talking about NCM 811 in 2018 and only next year it’ll be the mainstream chemistry. We might get aluminium-air batteries in 2030 and I’ll write about them in 2028 🙂

Marcos Rodriguez

Thanks Pedro, what about e-niro? SK? LG?, thank you

Freddy

Marcos: ENIRO (and new e-soul) should be the same as Hyundai Kona (or Kauai in Portugal) as they share all drivetrain/battery systems.

Pedro: very interesting insights in the article, as usual…

SK Innovation.

Marcos Rodriguez

Ah, ok ,Thank you, I just see it now in your update. And what about SK vs LG in terms of quality ? Does we have any user feedback or engineering testings?

Marcos Rodriguez

Thanks, I will see it

Lars

Have you considered making this article into a fixed page like the Range/Efficiency page? I mean a page that always will be easy to find at that you could update whenever new EVs with new batteries appear. I think it is very interesting to be able to compare the different EVs in terms of battery type.

Thanks for the suggestion Lars. I’ll consider it.

Marcel

love the battery articles like this, thanks!

Marcel

Also, it’ll be very interesting to see how this data might change after Tesla’s battery day event.

Thanks. Don’t forget to come back for more 🙂

carlos

Pedro, what’s your opinion on the Li-S battery from Brighsun. Their claims are pretty outrageous!

Hi Carlos. In my opinion it’s an unicorn, it doesn’t exist. Did you visited the website? It looks like made by scammers looking for dumb investors…

Brighsun!? Really!? Even the domain has a spelling error (insert facepalm emoji here).

http://www.brighsun.com/

carlos

Hehe, yeah, I must say I also had my doubts. There are some mentions on the web of an electric bus that has actually run for more than 1000 km on one charge, but it does not seem to have had a follow up. I believe Li-S can be an interesting chemistry but I’d be surprised to see they solved all the issues with it.

When that battery chemistry is ready, big players like LG Chem, Samsung SDI, SK Innovation, CATL and Tesla/Panasonic will let us know.

phexo

THanks for this article.

Any ideas about the small Panasonic 35,5 kWh battery of the Honda e and Mazda Mx-30 ?
How far good they are from the Tesla’s ones ?

Thank you !

All I know is that those are prismatic battery cells. Can’t find more information about them.

phexo

Okay thank you.

🙂

Jinteng

How about the Tesla Model 3 Made in China?
Current battery supplier for MIC Model 3 should be LGC China from their Nanjing factory.
But someone said Panasonic cell that produced at Giga Nevada may be used in Gigafactory Shanghai for a part of MIC Model 3.

Also some said LGC cell or CATL cell are not appropriate for Model 3 Long Range. But, Model 3 LR RWD will be produced at Giga Shanghai soon. What is going on?