Electricity Map Live

Electricity Map Live
Electricity Map

Electricity Map is a Open Source project that shows in real-time where your electricity comes from and how much CO2 was emitted to produce it. You can access the information on its website, or by using an iOS or Android app.

In Portugal this project is very popular among EV enthusiasts, since it shows us when our electricity comes from 100 % renewable sources and we can brag about it…

However, this project is more important than bragging rights, we can use it to see the big picture.

When we look at the map we can see a lot of grey areas where information isn’t even available. However, we can also see some beacons of hope in green areas where all or almost all electricity comes from low CO2-emitting sources.

The green areas represent the countries which can now benefit the most from the transition to electric transportation.

 

Anyway, I think that making this kind of vital information easy to access and understand is very important for a responsible citizenship. With it citizens can and should pressure some governments to do better by showing good examples.

 

What do you think? Are you surprised by some data available?

 

 

More info:

https://www.electricitymap.org

Pedro Lima
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Magnus H
2 years ago

I wouldn’t call the nuclear power of France “renewable”, even though it has low CO2-density.

2 years ago
Reply to  Magnus H

yes, some of those green areas produce low CO2, but the electricity isn’t renewable.

Tonton
2 years ago
Reply to  Magnus H

Of course nuclear is renewable. ASTRID test will prove that, using wastes from older generations of reactors to turn them into a near nirvana of radiating renewable energy! No need to pollute our landscapes with windmills and buying solar panels from exterior sources!

Ludo
2 years ago
Reply to  Magnus H

Yes France is the worst country…but Germany is so happy when they have not enought electricity to use the French one…

John Doe
2 years ago
Reply to  Magnus H

They are green due to low carbon footprint, but the data is divided – and have the renewable part displayed when you hover over the country.

Unless they can make a fusion reactor or use thorium – nuclear cost will be too high in the long run, and solar/wind will be the cheaper smart choise.

Look at the black places in India for example with 0% low carbon and 0% renewable… . that is as low as you can go.
They will benefit hugely by solar, to get a stable price for their electricity – and will not notice the rice in oil prices like now.

Marcel
2 years ago

This is cool, thanks

Tanstaafl
2 years ago

Thanks

Marcel
2 years ago

Pedro, to go off topic here, but what do you think of the pricing of the Audi e-Tron? 80,000 euros (assuming vat included) translates to ~$80K US ( or ~$100K+ here in Canada) which all seems high. In Canada the sq5 is $67K, and the middle trim q7 is $87K, so it looks like the e-Tron is asking for at least a $20K USD premium for electric drive.

Seems like a bit of a rip off to me, but I guess it’s a way to make extra money for Audi while making sure they don’t sell too many of them.

2 years ago
Reply to  Marcel

I’m not the right person to comment on the price since I consider all luxury cars a rip off.

However, since Audi is targeting Jaguar I-PACE and Tesla Model X, I guess we can’t complain about high prices.

John Doe
2 years ago
Reply to  Marcel

The battery is very expensive. They have to charge more in order to make money, without offering a car with low quality interior with cheap hard plastic and so on.
Jaguar said that about 60% of the cost of the car is the battery. That leaves 40% for the car and interior. To make it cheaper, thay have to either make it very spartan inside – or the have to fit the vehicle with cheap interior.
With induction charging coming. . . ever so slowly. . . – there will be less need of a large battery (for many users). Cars can be made cheaper. The battery cells will be cheaper too, so in maybe 5-7 years time, the cost of an EV battery and drivetrain will equal the cost of an ICE vehicle.

EHE
2 years ago

The bad thing is that LG have placed a factory for EV battery production in Poland where most of the electricity comes from coal.

2 years ago
Reply to  EHE

LG Chem also produces solar panels.

I will be surprised if they don’t install them at their battery plant, just like Tesla is doing at the Gigafactory.

John Doe
2 years ago
Reply to  EHE

Poland is business friendly AND the wages are low.
All the new(ish) car factories and battery factories in Europe are located in the countries with the lowest wages.

Ricardo
2 years ago

Many thanks Pedro, another great article. You can be sure I’ll be visiting electricitymap quite often.

Tom Houlden
2 years ago

Yes, Pedro: I was surprised & very disappointed to see no solar panels on the picture of the new factory!

On a topic related to that, what do you all think of this article claiming Earth has insufficient lithium to make EVs for everyone! “Even if everyone wanted to switch to EVs, there would not be enough lithium to go around. We will start to see new energy sources tested. Once those are developed, expect an exponential shift in the EV market.” (Daniel Yuabov, CEO and Co-Founder of Carvoy Ignite, an e-commerce SaaS platform for auto dealers.)

http://m.wardsauto.com/dealer/who-buys-evs-now-and-who-will-future?NL=WAW-04&Issue=WAW-04_20180315_WAW-04_975&cl=article_5&utm_rid=CPENT000004025084&utm_campaign=17391&utm_medium=email&elq2=4e05fa66beb34c0bad3e1e8247515209

2 years ago
Reply to  Tom Houlden

Lithium is not a problem.

https://electrek.co/2018/02/16/desalination-lithium/

Cobalt is the only raw material in EV batteries that is scarce right now. That’s why NCM 811 battery cells are so important.

2 years ago

Hi guys (Bruno from the Electricity Map team here),

We’re also making real-time forecasts. It could help EV owners around the world charge their EV at the best time to minimize CO2 emissions. Let me know what you think about this!

And thanks for the article!

2 years ago
Reply to  Bruno Lajoie

Amazing work Bruno, thanks for keeping it open-source.

KM
2 years ago

It would be interesting to have another map showing emissions per capita. I think some countries started to brag about their green credentials a bit too early.

Tom Houlden
2 years ago

Pedro: Thanks for debunkung the lithium claim. I thought it was wrong but wasn’t sure. Disappointing how much misinformation there is.
Bruno: Forecast seems cool but if many people USE a forecast to time their use, the forecast will eventually become be self-defeating.
KM: Agreed! Many Americans justify waste because “China is worse”, when in fact America is MUCH worse per capita.

Lars
2 years ago

I think a monthly or weekly average would be more interesting for me. I usually wouldn’t be able to wait until the amount of renewable energy is highest and how should I know if I am getting my energy from the renewable portion, assuming that the renewable portion is less than 100%. In that case it would probably be better if we could see which power supplier has how much renewable energy. But a nice website and app.

Don Zenga
2 years ago

France has the cleanest electricity with 80% coming from nuclear, 15% from hydro and probably another 3-4% from wind.
Anyway electricity is gradually becoming cleaner as the renewables are gaining steam.

jimjfox
2 years ago
Reply to  Don Zenga

Nonsense. The fuel that nuclear power plants use for nuclear fission is uranium. Unlike solar power and wind energy, uranium is a non-renewable resource. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/100%25_renewable_energy#Places_with_around_100%_renewable_electricity

PARAGUAY 100% hydroelectricity, about 90% of which is exported, remaining 10% covers domestic demand ICELAND 72% hydroelectricity, 28% geothermal, wind, and solar power, less than 0.1% combustible fuel
NORWAY 96% hydroelectricity, 2% combustible fuel, 2% geothermal, wind, and solar

Lars
2 years ago

Don Zenga: I wouldn’t call nuclear power clean, low CO2 yes, but the nuclear waste is not clean. Hydro, vind and solar power is clean.

Tom Houlden
2 years ago

No energy source is 100% “clean”, including human power (we emit CO2) but CO2 is on the verge of causing human extinction. Nuclear power could help delay that until we get to 100% renewable.