Electric car range and efficiency table (NEDC)

Electric Cars Range and Efficiency Table (NEDC)

After the success of the Electric car range and efficiency (EPA) table, it’s now time to have a NEDC version.

However, take notice that NEDC (New European Driving Cycle) rates aren’t realistic, unfortunately we only have EPA rates for electric cars sold in the USA. The good news is that NEDC will be soon replaced by WLTP (Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedure).

 

Without further ado here is the table:

 

Electric car range and efficiency (NEDC)

Electric carRangeEfficiency
2017 BMW i3 (60 Ah battery)118 miles
190 km
20,76 kWh/100 miles
12,9 kWh/100 km
2017 BMW i3 (94 Ah battery and 19“ wheels)194 miles
312 km
20,28 kWh/100 miles
12,6 kWh/100 km
2017 BMW i3 (94 Ah battery and 20“ wheels)186 miles
300 km
21,08 kWh/100 miles
13,1 kWh/100 km
2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV
Opel Ampera-e
323 miles
520 km
23,34 kWh/100 miles
14,5 kWh/100 km
2016 Ford Focus Electric100 miles
160 km
24,78 kWh/100 miles
15,4 kWh/100 km
2017 Ford Focus Electric
140 miles
225 km
26,39 kWh/100 miles
16,4 kWh/100 km
2017 Hyundai IONIQ Electric174 miles
280 km
18,51 kWh/100 miles
11,5 kWh/100 km
2017 Kia Soul EV132 miles
212 km
23,66 kWh/100 miles
14,7 kWh/100 km
2018 Kia Soul EV155 miles
250 km
23,01 kWh/100 miles
14,3 kWh/100 km
2016 Nissan Leaf (24 kWh battery)124 miles
199 km
24,14 kWh/100 miles
15 kWh/100 km
2017 Nissan Leaf (30 kWh battery)155 miles
250 km
24,14 kWh/100 miles
15 kWh/100 km
2017 Tesla Model S 60D253 miles
408 km
2017 Tesla Model S 75D304 miles
490 km
Volkswagen e-up!99 miles
160 km
18,83 kWh/100 miles
11,7 kWh/100 km
2016 Volkswagen e-Golf118 miles
190 km
20,44 kWh/100 miles
12,7 kWh/100 km
2017 Volkswagen e-Golf186 miles
300 km
20,44 kWh/100 miles
12,7 kWh/100 km
Renault Zoe Q210 (22 kWh battery and 15/16“ wheels)130 miles
210 km
23,5 kWh/100 miles
14,6 kWh/100 km
Renault Zoe Q210 (22 kWh battery and 17“ wheels)121 miles
195 km
25,3 kWh/100 miles
15,7 kWh/100 km
Renault Zoe R240 (23,3 kWh battery and 15/16“ wheels)149 miles
240 km
21,4 kWh/100 miles
13,3 kWh/100 km
Renault Zoe R240 (23,3 kWh battery and 17“ wheels)140 miles
225 km
22,83 kWh/100 miles
14,2 kWh/100 km
Renault Zoe Q90 (41 kWh battery and 15/16“ wheels)230 miles
370 km
23,5 kWh/100 miles
14,6 kWh/100 km
Renault Zoe Q90 (41 kWh battery and 17“ wheels)217 miles
350 km
24,84 kWh/100 miles
15,4 kWh/100 km
Renault Zoe R90 (41 kWh battery and 15/16“ wheels)250 miles
403 km
21,4 kWh/100 miles
13,3 kWh/100 km
Renault Zoe R90 (41 kWh battery and 17“ wheels)228 miles
367 km
23,5 kWh/100 miles
14,6 kWh/100 km
Citroen C-Zero (old 16 kWh battery version)93 miles
150 km
21,73 kWh/100 miles
13,5 kWh/100 km
Citroen C-Zero (new 14,5 kWh battery version)93 miles
150 km
20,28 kWh/100 miles
12,6 kWh/100 km
Peugeot iOn (old 16 kWh battery version)93 miles
150 km
21,73 kWh/100 miles
13,5 kWh/100 km
Peugeot iOn (new 14,5 kWh battery version)93 miles
150 km
20,28 kWh/100 miles
12,6 kWh/100 km
Mitsubishi i-MiEV (prior to 2015)93 miles
150 km
21,73 kWh/100 miles
13,5 kWh/100 km
Mitsubishi i-MiEV (2015 and later)99 miles
160 km
20,12 kWh/100 miles
12,5 kWh/100 km

 

Remember that like EPA, NEDC figures also measure plug-to-wheels consumption, this means that the internal charger efficiency matters.

 

It was a pain in the ass to find some figures and some are still missing (Tesla efficiency). Nevertheless, I like the final result and think that this table can help potential electric car buyers in Europe decide which one to get. However, if the electric car you want has EPA rates available, look at those instead.

You can find every available comparison table at the top menu navigation bar. I’ll not only keep them updated but also add more categories. At the moment I’m thinking of comparing sales and prices of electric cars in different countries.

 

Any suggestions, let me know!

This Post Has 17 Comments

  1. More interesting is to compare the epa highway consumption rating. Which is where range and efficiency is important. There you can see that the ioniq stands out, the egolf is pretty good actually and the Tesla model s is really good for being such a big car!

    1. The new 2017 Volkswagen e-Golf is definitely a pleasant surprise in many aspects.

  2. Great table! Very interesting!
    Where did you take official NEDC data on range and global efficiency?
    Thanks!
    Lorenzo

    1. Thanks Lorenzo.

      From official sources, in most cases from the automakers’ websites.

  3. Thanks Pedro!
    I did not understand what is the official website that collects all NEDC data… If I want to see EPA data, I can navigate http://www.fueleconomy.gov and find – for each car – total range (in miles) and energy consumption (in MPGe).
    What website should I see for NEDC data?

    1. In this case the official sources are the automakers’ websites. Unfortunately there isn’t one independent source that collects all NEDC data.

  4. Hello Pedro Lima, Thank You for the information provided. May I know if the Energy consumption also includes the energy generated due to regenerative braking in NEDC cycle?

    1. Hello Sanketh.

      The energy consumption is measured at the plug, this means that is measured after the regenerative braking was used and also takes into account the internal charger’s efficiency.

  5. Be aware that differences may be much larger between NEDC than actual range than you think. I.e. Bolt (Opel Ampera-e) differs a lot when you use heating or cooling. In Renault Zoe they have installed a heating pump, which when used – does not influence the range very much. Smart!

  6. Could you please share the references for the offcial sources? Specifically for the Renault Zoe, the Nissan Leaf and the Tesla model X or S. Thank you.

    1. Hello Evarista. Sorry for the late reply.

      I don’t remember the actual websites where I got those figures, but you can use Google to track some official and unofficial sources. Just search for PDFs.

      Renault Zoe:

      http://www.asp.si/uploaded/files/SLO_cenik_Zoe_20150901.pdf

      http://zoepionierin.de/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Renault-ZOE-R240.pdf

      http://www.mobilityhouse.com/en/portfolio/renault-electric-cars/

      Nissan Leaf:

      https://www.nissan-cdn.net/content/dam/Nissan/pt/brochures/E-Catalago_Leaf_PT.pdf

      https://www.hyundai-ioniq.com/uk/compare/electric/results

      As for the Tesla cars, I actually didn’t found the NEDC efficiency rates and that’s why I left them blank.

  7. Hi Pedro Lima.
    Thanks for a good overview. Actually there is an electric vehicle database which besides all other brands also includes Tesla models. https://ev-database.uk/

    1. I can see now that the database https://ev-database.uk/ holds figures which are not equal to the figures in the overview in this post. It seems that the figures in the UK database are calculated based on the range of vehicle and capacity of the battery?

  8. This badly needs a testing enum value (NEDC, EPA), because I don’t always remember which cars are in the US market. Most are in many markets in addition, so I’m still uncertain. You could alternatively just have have a US-market or EPA bit.

  9. There should be updates now. The Nissan Leaf 2018 model brings evs into the mainstream, and the 14.3 KWh per 100 kilometres I get on mine is better than a lot of cars on this list. Why isn’t the Nissan LEAF even listed at all in the EPA table? This is a serious omission.

  10. no Smart?

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