Hyundai IONIQ EV has a 28 kWh battery

Hyundai IONIQ EV has a 28 kWh battery
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This is a big disappointment for me. I really expected more from IONIQ EV.

 

The T configuration battery has its limitations.

 

With a 88 kW electric motor, a top speed of 150 km/h and an EPA range of 105 miles (169 km) this car would have been great in 2010. In 2016 it already feels dated. The only things that makes it a little better are some safety features that aren’t present in most current EVs. By this I mean automatic emergency braking system (AEB) and Advanced Smart Cruise Control (ASCC).

Now the only way that this EV can be successful is by having a lower price than the current EV offer. Since the Chevrolet Bolt will arrive just a few months later and by then Volkswagen e-Golf and BMW i3 will have more range with the upgraded batteries coming this summer.

Well, since I tend to look for the positive in every situation, I think that the drag coefficient of 0,24 makes this car more efficient than most of the competition. The Nissan Leaf for example has a real drag coefficient of 0,32 (officially is 0,29).

I also want to know how will it handle fast charging. Since Kia Soul EV from Hyundai’s sister company is known for charging faster than the competition, when the CHAdeMO charging station supports it. I think that the American and European versions will drop CHAdeMO in favor of CCS.

 

 

More info:

http://insideevs.com/hyundai-ioniq-has-a-28-kwh-battery-105-miles-real-range/

http://insideevs.com/car-driver-aero-comparo-tesla-model-s-versus-volt-leaf-prius-video/

Pedro Lima

My interest in electric transportation is mostly political. I’m tired of coups and wars for oil. My expectation is that the adoption of electric transportation will be a factor for peace and democracy all over the world.
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Ralf K
Ralf K
4 years ago

> I also want to know how will it handle fast charging. Since Kia
> Soul EV from Hyundai’s sister company is known for charging
> faster than the competition, when the CHAdeMO charging
> station supports it. I think that the American and European
> versions will drop CHAdeMO in favor of CCS.

So it is.

http://insideevs.com/hyundai-confirms-sae-combo-100-kw-fast-charging-for-ioniq-electric/

EU: CCS, Type2 100 kW DC; 6,6kW AC over Type2 (presented at Geneva)

US: CCS, Type1 100 kW DC; 6,6kW AC over Type1
(presented at New York)

Korea/Japan: ChaDeMO, 100 kW; and 6,6kW AC Type1 (from https://youtu.be/qmNTVCbjJOA?t=2m2s )

DC charging: 20 minutes (24 min stated elsewhere) recharge up to 80% of 28 kWh battery on a 100kW charger. As before, this will likely mean:
the charger will be capped at 500V DC and 200A or 250A, but also capped at 100 kWDC. ioniq EV will then use an appropriate *portion* of this for the different charging situations over time. So actually used peak charging rates may be at around 75 kW DC out of the 100 kW DC.

EPA range is 168 km. 80% being 134 km.
NEDC range is 248 km. 80% being 200 km.

So, once the 100 kW DC chargers are there, this means: about 150 km of additional range in about 20-24 min.

Flies in the ointment: Someone needs to install a network of these 100 kW DC chargers with CCS/ChaDeMO.

And charging maps/chargers need to have a clear assignment, what chargers are capable of what DC output power. Because there are ChaDeMo/CCS chargers in all sorts of sub-flavours: 10kW DC (mostly portable), 20 kW DC (some portable, some of them fixed), 30 kW DC, 50 kW DC, and then 100 kW 200A DC capped, and 100 kW 250 A DC capped. As the impact can be charging times being 5 times more than expected/advertised, this will very likely cause confusion with customers, that will only decrease with more customer education and better labelling. Or color coding for that matter.