Ford is happy with 100 miles range EVs

Ford Focus Electric

 

No plans for 200 miles range in the near future.

 

Ford’s director of electrification programs and engineering, Kevin Layden recently said that the 100 miles range Ford Focus Electric, coming this fall is enough to make happy most of EV drivers.

“I think right now with the launch of the Focus Electric at 100 miles, it is going to satisfy a big chunk of the population. It’s going to be really affordable and a step up from where we are now.”

 

Layden said that the lower range enables the use of a smaller, lighter and less expensive battery pack. The reality is that a bigger battery wouldn’t fit in the trunk.

A battery capable of offering 200 miles range would require a dedicated EV platform, something that Ford isn’t interested at the moment.

At least Ford is committed to make EVs more affordable, so I expect a big price cut to make Ford Focus Electric survive the upcoming 200 miles range EVs.

 

 

More info:

http://www.autonews.com/article/20160418/OEM05/304189970/no-200-mile-electric-car-in-fords-future

Pedro Lima

More than natural resources, are wasted human resources that bothers me the most. That's why I'm a strong advocate of a society based on cooperation, not competition, that helps every individual to reach his full potential so that he can contribute back to society. "From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs".

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5 Responses

  1. Erik says:

    I can live with a 100 mile range EV if it is affordable. But prefer a 100 mile Ford Fiesta Electric.

  2. Bret says:

    I’m glad Ford is satisfied with 100 miles, but most of their customers won’t be. It’s a shame the Focus Electric has never sold well and 100 of range miles won’t help that.

    200 miles of AER is the new entry level EV in the US. Cheaper NEVs will probably sell well in many countries, but not for anyone in the US, who commutes to work or lives in rural areas. It’s just not a practical replacement for an ICE vehicle.

  3. Ralf K says:

    >>Layden said that the lower range enables the use of a smaller, lighter and less expensive battery pack. The reality is that a bigger battery wouldn’t fit in the trunk.<>A battery capable of offering 200 miles range would require a dedicated EV platform, something that Ford isn’t interested at the moment.<200 miles on batteries after conversion.

    Chevrolet Bolt EV – a former ICE car (Chevrolet Sonic) on a conventional platform plus batteries, >200 miles after conversion. Ok, GM+LG did some major construction changes. But not really a completely new platform, rather a variant of the existing one.

    VW e-Golf VII – a former ICE car on a conventional platform plus batteries, >200 miles achievable as follows: instead of 25Ah cells, put 37Ah cells in its underfloor battery (keep the 88s3p configuration) and put an additional flat battery (88s1p) into the trunk also with 37Ah cells => wire both in parallel, integrate with battery management system and charging => this will gain about 48 kWh total. Once aerodynamically refined, 200 miles seems well feasible. Add 100 kW CCS charging => there is the Model 3 competitor. 🙂 At least, as soon as there will be enough 50 kW/100 kW CCS charging points.

    The flat trunk battery for e-Golf was already shown by Metron in cooperation with Meyle, a German supplier.
    http://eauto.si/metron-shop/?product=electric-range-extender-vw-e-golf

    >> At least Ford is committed to make EVs more affordable, so I expect a big price cut to make Ford Focus Electric survive the upcoming 200 miles range EVs.<<

    Ford could well do both: a 100 mile entry model for a cheaper price (eg. 22.000 USD). And a 200 mile model as a Model 3 competitor at a similar more enthusiastic price of 35.000 USD.

  4. Ralf K says:

    Please delete the former comment, as it got corrupted.

    Pedro, you said: “Layden said that the lower range enables the use of a smaller, lighter and less expensive battery pack. The reality is that a bigger battery wouldn’t fit in the trunk. A battery capable of offering 200 miles range would require a dedicated EV platform, something that Ford isn’t interested at the moment.”

    I somewhat agree, but other OEMs did manage to get 200 miles from a car, that the OEM converted from ICE to BEV on an existing platform. Examples include:

    BYD e5 and ev300 – formerly an ICE car (BYD Su Rui). They added batteries and achieved more than 200 miles after conversion.

    Chevrolet Bolt EV – a former ICE car (Chevrolet Sonic). Adding batteries, they achieved more than 200 miles after conversion. Ok, GM+LG did some major construction changes. But not really a completely new platform, rather a variant of the existing one.

    VW e-Golf VII – a former ICE car. Keeping the conventional platform, but adding batteries, more than 200 miles are achievable as follows: instead of 25Ah cells, put 37Ah cells in its underfloor battery (keep the 88s3p configuration) and put an additional flat battery (88s1p) into the trunk also with 37Ah cells; then wire both in parallel, integrate with battery management system and charging. This will gain about 48 kWh total with very little effort actually. Once aerodynamically refined, 200 miles seems well feasible. The flat trunk battery for e-Golf was already shown by Metron in cooperation with Meyle, a major German automotive supplier.
    http://eauto.si/metron-shop/?product=electric-range-extender-vw-e-golf

    Pedro, you said: “At least Ford is committed to make EVs more affordable, so I expect a big price cut to make Ford Focus Electric survive the upcoming 200 miles range EVs.”

    Ford could well do both: a 100 mile entry model of Focus BEV for a cheaper price (eg. 22k USD). And a 200 mile Ford Focus BEV as a Model 3/Leaf 60 kWh/Bolt EV competitor at a similar more enthusiastic price of 30k to 35k USD.

    Once OEMs added 100 kW CCS charging and build enough 50 kW/100 kW CCS charging points, these cars will serve as Model 3 competitors.

  5. Ralf K says:

    Pedro, you said: “A battery capable of offering 200 miles range would require a dedicated EV platform, something that Ford isn’t interested at the moment.”

    Looks like development has already started on a combined HEV/PHEV/EV platform, as here are Ford’s plans on EVs:
    http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1103293_2019-ford-model-e-hybrid-electric-car-coming-from-mexico-plant

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